Intel Core i3-12300 Performance: DDR5 vs DDR4

Intel’s 12th generation processors from the top of the stack, including the flagship Core i9-12900K) and the more affordable and entry-level offerings such as the Core i3-12300, allow users to build a new system with the latest technologies available. One of the main elements that make Intel’s Alder Lake processors flexible for users building a new system is that it includes support for both DDR5 and DDR4 memory. It’s no secret that DDR5 memory costs (far) more than the already established DDR4 counterparts. One element to this includes an early adopter’s fee. Having the latest and greatest technology comes at a price premium.

The reason why we have opted to test the difference in performance between DDR5 and DDR4 memory with the Core i3-12300 is simply down to the price point. While users will most likely be looking to use DDR5 with the performance SKUs such as the Core i9-12900K, Core i7-12700K, and Core i5-12600K, users building a new system with the Core i3-12300 are more likely to go down a more affordable route. This includes using DDR4 memory, which is inherently cheaper than DDR5 and opting for a cheaper motherboard such as an H670, B660, or H610 option. Such systems do give up some performance versus what the i3-12300 can do at its peak, but in return it can bring costs down signfiicantly.

Traditionally we test our memory settings at JEDEC specifications. JEDEC is the standards body that determines the requirements for each memory standard. In the case of Intel's Alder Lake, the Core i3 supports both DDR5 and DDR4 memory. Below are the memory settings we used for our DDR5 versus DDR4 testing:

  • DDR4-3200 CL22
  • DDR5-4800(B) CL40

CPU Performance: DDR5 versus DDR4

(1-2) AppTimer: GIMP 2.10.18 (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(2-1) 3D Particle Movement v2.1 (non-AVX) (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(2-2) 3D Particle Movement v2.1 (Peak AVX) (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(2-5) NAMD ApoA1 Simulation (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(4-1) Blender 2.83 Custom Render Test (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(4-2) Corona 1.3 Benchmark (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(4-4) POV-Ray 3.7.1 (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(4-6a) CineBench R20 Single Thread (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(4-6b) CineBench R20 Multi-Thread (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(4-7a) CineBench R23 Single Thread (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(4-7b) CineBench R23 Multi-Thread (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(5-1a) Handbrake 1.3.2, 1080p30 H264 to 480p Discord (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(5-1b) Handbrake 1.3.2, 1080p30 H264 to 720p YouTube (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(5-1c) Handbrake 1.3.2, 1080p30 H264 to 4K60 HEVC (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(5-4) WinRAR 5.90 Test, 3477 files, 1.96 GB (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(8-1c) Geekbench 5 Single Thread (DDR5 vs DDR4)

(8-1d) Geekbench 5 Multi-Thread (DDR5 vs DDR4)

In our computational benchmarks, there wasn't much difference between DDR5-4800 CL40 and DDR4-3200 CL22 when using the Core i3-12300. The biggest difference came in our WinRAR benchmark which is heavily reliant on memory to increase performance; the DDR5 performed around 21% better than DDR4 in this scenario.

Gaming Performance: DDR5 versus DDR4

(b-7) Civilization VI - 1080p Max - Average FPS

(b-8) Civilization VI - 1080p Max - 95th Percentile

(b-5) Civilization VI - 4K Min - Average FPS (copy)

(b-6) Civilization VI - 4K Min - 95th Percentile (copy)

(g-7) Borderlands 3 - 1080p Max - Average FPS (copy)

(g-8) Borderlands 3 - 1080p Max - 95th Percentile (copy)

(g-5) Borderlands 3 - 4K VLow - Average FPS (copy)

(g-6) Borderlands 3 - 4K VLow - 95th Percentile (copy)

(i-7) Far Cry 5 - 1080p Ultra - Average FPS (copy)

(i-8) Far Cry 5 - 1080p Ultra - 95th Percentile (copy)

(i-5) Far Cry 5 - 4K Low - Average FPS (copy)

(i-6) Far Cry 5 - 4K Low - 95th Percentile (copy)

On the whole, DDR5 does perform better in our gaming tests, but not enough to make it a 'must have' in comparison to DDR4 memory. The gains overall are marginal for the most part, with DDR5 offering around 3-7 more frames per second over DDR4 memory, depending on the titles game engine optimization.

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  • nandnandnand - Monday, March 7, 2022 - link

    The 8-core chiplet with high yields makes 4-cores pointless for AMD to produce, and that won't change anytime soon since Zen 4 and probably Zen 5 will use 8-core chiplets.

    https://videocardz.com/newz/amd-rumored-to-launch-...

    The real "problem" is that AMD hiked prices during Intel's stumbles. A good strategy that made them lots of cash during a chip shortage/supply crisis. But if that leak is correct, they will launch a 6-core near $100-120 to counter budget Alder Lake chips like the i3-12100F.

    AMD could put Van Gogh on AM5 for the DIY market. That would use 7nm while other products move down to 5nm. They will also have basic graphics on Zen 4 Raphael which would allow for office-type builds without discrete GPUs. Finally, there is the Monet on GloFo 12LP+ rumor. Even if that was laptop only, it could be an impulse buy (use display output).

    AM5 will only be a good budget option when the DDR5 prices come down, but the Zen 3 price cuts and new rumored CPUs keep AM4 in the running.
    Reply
  • Qasar - Tuesday, March 8, 2022 - link

    " The real "problem" is that AMD hiked prices during Intel's stumbles " and its the same " problem " intel did pre zen, yet very few seem to complain about it then. whats your point ?
    some really need to let this go, its like some think amd should of kept their prices low, as thats what they did before, before they had the performance to go with those prices, like you know, intel did all those years ?
    Reply
  • mode_13h - Tuesday, March 8, 2022 - link

    > office-type builds without discrete GPUs.

    Office-type PCs haven't had dGPUs for more than a decade!

    Heck, I used a Sandbridge i7-2600K without a dGPU, and it was entirely fine at 1440p.
    Reply
  • eloyard - Sunday, March 6, 2022 - link

    In Poland there are pretty much no compatible Intel boards under 100$, meanwhile there are plenty of B450 and few B550 available. Cheapest of them at 50$.

    Intel's up to their usual stuff misleading market? Why am i not surprised.
    Reply
  • 529th - Sunday, March 6, 2022 - link

    Why has Anandtech benches excluded CS:GO? Reply
  • MDD1963 - Monday, March 7, 2022 - link

    Wonder just how many purchasing the 12300 are also getting Z690,...and DDR5? :) Reply
  • mode_13h - Tuesday, March 8, 2022 - link

    Exactly. Reply
  • dicobalt - Friday, March 11, 2022 - link

    DDR5 4800 costs 250% of DDR4 3200 but only gives 10% performance improvement. I keep telling people the DDR5 launch is premature until Q4-2024 to Q1-2025 when all the major memory manufacturers finally have new fabs online. Reply
  • kath1mack - Thursday, April 14, 2022 - link

    Looks great Reply

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